Thriller/Mystery

ON Tour with The Last Thing She Said (A Chris Matheson Cold Case Mystery #3) by Lauren Carr and Meet the Author

Lauren is back!

The Last Thing She Said (A Chris Matheson Cold Case Mystery #3) by Lauren Carr released in July in the Mystery genre.

“I’m working on the greatest mystery ever,” was the last thing noted mystery novelist Mercedes Livingston said to seven-year-old Chris Matheson before walking out of Hill House Hotel never to be seen again.

For decades, the writer’s fate remained a puzzling mystery until an autographed novel and a letter put a grown-up Chris Matheson on the trail of a cunning killer. With the help of a team of fellow retired law enforcement officers, each a specialist in their own field of investigation, Chris puts a flame to this cold case to uncover what had really happened that night Mercedes Livingston walked out of Hill House Hotel. Watch out! The clues are getting hot!

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Meet the author:    Lauren Carr is the international best-selling author of the Thorny Rose, Mac Faraday, Lovers in Crime, and Chris Matheson Cold Case Mysteries—over twenty titles across four fast-paced mystery series filled with twists and turns!

Book reviewers and readers alike rave about how Lauren Carr seamlessly crosses genres to include mystery, suspense, crime fiction, police procedurals, romance, and humor.

Lauren is a popular speaker who has made appearances at schools, youth groups, and on author panels at conventions. She lives with her husband, and two spoiled rotten German shepherds on a mountain in Harpers Ferry, WV.

Mystery Writing Is Murder

By Lauren Carr

American Journalist and Biographer Gene Fowler once said, “Writing is easy: All you do is sit staring at a blank sheet of paper until drops of blood form on your forehead.”

Yeah, right. Try writing murder mysteries. Not only will drops of blood be forming on your forehead, but it will be dripping out of your eyeballs as well.

I’m sure any author of any genre will claim that theirs is the most difficult to write. 

As a murder mystery writer, I claim that murder mystery writing is the tougher game, especially for writers, like me, who prefer to keep their books character driven and to have their protagonist solve the case with his brilliant intellect. 

Some readers, and writers, have found that the reality of technology and the justice system has thrown a monkey wrench into the general murder mystery premise:

Someone gets killed. Detective surveys the scene. Questions all of the witnesses. Tracks down suspects. Cunning Killer lies. Detective is stumped. Cunning Killer slips up. Brilliant Hero detects the Killer’s mistake. Traps Killer. Killer confesses and goes off to prison.

Justice prevails.

Anyone fourth grader knows that such is not the case in real life. 

Between technology: “Oh, you say you were never in that room? Well, we found your DNA from where you sneezed on the victim’s baloney sandwich right before you slit his throat with the butter knife.” 

And justice system: “Is that all you got? A car filled with nuns saw your suspect running out of the house with a bloody knife in his hand at the time of the murder? His defense attorney is going to claim that they are conspiring to railroad him into jail because he’s Jewish. Come back with something more and I’ll get you a search warrant for the bloody knife.”

Some mystery writers see this as a killjoy. What fun is there in having a dull computer database spit out the name of the killer, especially when it’s someone who wasn’t even on the protagonist’s radar? Then, many readers, myself included, get frustrated when the mystery turns from a whodunit, but how-are-we-gonna-catch-‘em? 

This is where the rubber hits the road. In reality, these hurdles add to the fun for the author. It doesn’t take away from the protagonist. Real detectives, true-life protagonists, deal with these real issues every day.

Sure, the computer database, devoid of personality, may spit out the pieces of the puzzle, just like the collection of witnesses may lay out their pieces of the puzzle. A clever defense lawyer may throw up legal hurdles to protect the killer—but hasn’t that always been the case? 

Today’s real detectives come up against different types of hurdles than the investigators of fifty years ago, which were different from the hurdles fifty years before that.

While the murder investigation game may be different than it was in the days of Hercule Poirot and Perry Mason, it hasn’t become any less thrilling.

One thing that has not changed: Murder has been around since the days of Cain and Abel. As long as there are motives for murder, it will never go away. Also, protagonists will always have to be on their toes to anticipate and find their way over hurdles thrown up by their antagonists, whether they be killers or defense attorneys or judges. 

The game of writing murder mysteries is always changing—and never dull.

Connect with the author:   Website  ~  Twitter  ~  Facebook  ~  Instagram

Giveaway:​

  • $50 Amazon gift card

http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/518e72843/?


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ON Tour with The Last Thing She Said (A Chris Matheson Cold Case Mystery #3) by Lauren Carr and Meet the Author #mystery #suspense #coldcase #coldcasemystery @iReadBookTours


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2 replies »

  1. Thank you so much for kicking off THE LAST THING SHE SAID tour with this guest post about the challenges of mystery writing. Every genre offers writers its own unique challenges. Would love to hear from your romance/romantic-suspense followers about the challenges of writing their chosen genre.

    Liked by 1 person

    • You’re very welcome! For me, the biggest challenge is to make it logical. Things can’t happen just because, what happens has to develop in a natural way. And the details…. keep all of them straight can be complicated. Thank you for stopping by!

      Liked by 1 person

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