Romance

The villains of Crescent Creek #bookhooks

I was at Kate Hill’s on Friday, and she has the coolest blog! Compelling Beasts is a page of hers dedicated to Villains, and for the first time I got the chance to talk about mines. Well, Crescent Creek’s, really. Also, this is part of the Book Hooks, another super cool way to discover new authors.

First of all, thank you for having me, Kate! It’s the first time I talk about my villains, so I’ll tell you a bit about all the ones in my series Crescent Creek.

In All Those Miles I Walked, we have a classic case of a politician gone bad (I mean, very bad). Frances Hailey had eyes on high chairs and no qualms about taking out any inconvenience. The inconvenience was Eva, a dear friend of DJ and Scott, the leading couple, which is what set the ball rolling. Was he redeemable? No. He had been carrying on his plan for years now, and he’d have kept right on doing it if he hadn’t been caught. As far as villains go, he was not one of the most intriguing, too. He doesn’t even appear in the story, but it’s because of him that DJ and Scott get their second chance. Then there’s Frances’ minion, the petty hired gun putting DJ in real danger… a criminal that, thankfully, ended up in jail where he belongs.

Now, the villain in Painted Love is the most interesting.
The villain is the Heroine.
Yep. You see, Florence is a thief, and gets close to Rhett only because he’s friend with Aidan, her target.
The clash within her heart (finish something she’d started out of justice versus stop doing it out of love), and the war between her heart and brain (being with Rhett because she was falling for him versus being with him because he was an accessory to her plan) plagued her throughout the entire book. Guilt poked at her from everywhere – for what she was doing to Rhett, for the promise to his step-brother that bound her to keep going, to the memory of her grandfather.
She was a very complex, and lonely, person, and it doesn’t really surprise me she fell for someone like Rhett, with his huge heart and rock-solid moral compass.
Is she redeemable? Yes. Very much so, and the end of the book is proof of it.
She fixed the wrong she’d done after Rhett left her, and that is how much loving him changed her (no worries, there is a HEA).

In His Midnight Sun, the villain is a straight-out psychopath.
Basically, Lilith Chapman set off to avenge the man she loved after he committed suicide over Summer, the Heroine.
Lilith had for Stephen the kind of love that’s sick and wrong, and when his love for Summer took him away from her (or that’s how Lilith sees his suicide) she decided to take away everything from Summer, too.
An eye for an eye. Stephen for all that’s dear to Summer–which turned out to be Aidan and Chloe.
And boy, doesn’t she come close to making it a couple of times…
Was she redeemable? Well, I don’t have a cut answer to it. I think we can all agree Lilith was a bad person, had a bad heart. She also had mental health issues, like, big time. Maybe if someone had cared for her, loved her, she wouldn’t have come to plot a murder. But she grew up in an abusive family and had married an abusive man. I’m not justifying her actions, just speculating if she could have ever been “saved”, or, at the very least, helped.

So here they are, I hope you’ll get a chance to read the stories!


Hop with us:


1. Let me love you – Iris Blobel2. Wednesday A Marriage Takes Two
3. Counterfeits: An Art Theft Romance and Suspense4. Villains of Crescent Creek
5. The Invisible Truth – Kayelle Allen6. Russian Pride #HollyBargo
7. Wild Fire #SloanMcBride8. The Contractors Baby #LynnChantale
9. I Don’t Want to Rush You – Kate Hill
Advertisements

Categories: Romance

Tagged as: , ,

4 replies »

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.