On Tour with Love on the Line (Women at Work Book 1) by Kirsten Fullmer, Meet the Author and Giveaway

Once upon a time, when I still lived in Italy, I said to our mechanic that in my next life I wanted to be a mechanic, too (I still think that, if any career with horses doesn’t happen–again, damn it). He laughed. I got pissed. I’m on the small side. So what? It’s not like he lifted those big engines by hand. All this to say that I do understand the Heroine of this story. So, so much! And I love this story.

The story is Love on the Line (Women at Work Book 1) by Kirsten Fullmer, a Women’s Fiction, Romance.

Synopsis.

Andy may not have pipeline know-how, per se, but she’s got brains and every right to prove that she can do the job. Her estranged grandpa, Buck, believes she has what it takes to be his engineering assistant, and she’s not about to let him down.

Rooster isn’t a bad guy. He respects women; he was raised by one of the best. But that new girl is too small and… feminine. She’s a distraction, plain and simple, and she doesn’t belong on a pipeline. This job is his chance to impress Buck Brennan, a pipeline legend, and no girly greenhorn is going to ruin it for him.

Will Andy prove herself to her grandfather and forge a relationship with the old man, or will continuous disagreements and unexpected sexual tension between Andy and Rooster derail their hard work?

**Only .99 cents!!**

Goodreads* Amazon

Video Trailer:

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SMkVlybyq_o&t=10s

About the Author

KirstenKirsten grew up in the Western US and graduated from high school in 1984. She married soon thereafter and quickly built a family. With three young children and number four on the way, she returned to college in 1992. Her career as a draftsman included many settings ranging from a steel fabrication shops to prestigious engineering firms. Balancing family life with the workplace forced her to become the queen of multitasking. In 2001, bored with the cubical life, she moved on to teach drafting in technical college, then to opening her own consulting firm teaching 3D engineering software. Due to health problems, Kirsten retired in 2012 to travel with her husband for his job. She now works writing romance novels and enjoys spoiling her three grandchildren. Since 2017 Kirsten has lived and worked full time in a 40′ travel trailer with her husband and her little dog Bingo.

I had the enormous pleasure to talk with her, and her where this book comes from, and here’s what she tells me. 

My latest book, Love on the Line, is the story of Andy, a woman who chooses to work building a pipeline in the rugged mountains of West Virginia. Why did I write about this? I wrote it partly because I was inspired by the experiences of my own daughter who entertained me with many of her personal experiences as a pipeliner. But I also wrote it because I too chose to work in a male dominated field back in the day. Some of the struggles of women in these fields are upsetting, but many are inspiring and funny, thus perfect material for the kind of books I love to write. Just because not many women choose to do it, doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be done, right?

More than any time in recorded history, women are choosing to work in male dominated fields. Every day you come across a woman truck driver, firefighter, or pharmacist. And even though it’s become commonplace, many fields stick with their traditional titles such as policeman, draftsman, and even garbage man. Given this plus the infamous glass ceiling, why would a woman choose to spend their entire career fighting an uphill battle? There are a million reasons, but overwhelmingly, the answer I find is “because I want to” or “because the job appealed to me,” or “My dad and grandpa did it, why shouldn’t I?”

When was the idea planted for women to take the jobs they wanted, even if they were traditionally considered only suitable for men?  Some would say with Eve, but both folklore and history are filled with women who not only worked at the jobs they pleased, they ruled societies: Joan of Ark and Cleopatra, to name a few. In Victorian times, women who wrote were forced to use a male pen name or work without recognition. But the women of my grandmother’s generation were forced to work at jobs considered appropriate only for men during world war II.  They worked everywhere from factories to the fields. Sadly, after a taste of the liberation a paycheck affords a person, these women were expected to quietly step back into the kitchen once the men came home.

My mother’s generation, were blessed with not only their mother’s experiences, but all manner of modern conveniences which allowed them to clean and cook and generally care for their families in a fraction of the time it took their mothers. Many of these women took it upon themselves to “have it all” and step out into the working world, and not just as nurses and schoolteachers.  Their bravery gave the women of my generation the encouragement and conviction that we too could plan a career. However, we quickly learned that we couldn’t be super mom and have a demanding and time consuming career without a shift in attitude, and this shift had to come from the men. The change had to happen not just because of the aforesaid glass ceiling on the job, but because we needed help at home.

Do I think only women who work have value, and somehow women who don’t work away from home are lesser somehow? Of course not! In my lifetime I have been a stay at home mom, a sick in bed mom, a full time student mom, an employed full time mom, and a retired mom. All of those words we put on women are pointless when you realize that we are in this together, and we should be supportive and understanding, no matter what role you chose.

So, take a moment this summer to grab a copy of Love on the Line. Then curl up in a corner with a cup of coffee and prepare yourself for a heartwarming story filled with feminine strength, challenge, bravery, friendship, and romance.

To stay in contact with Kirsten, follow any of these links:

Website* Facebook* Twitter* Instagram* Pinterest * Amazon* Goodreads


love on the line bannerExcerpt

     “You’ll need these…” Travis’ voice drifted off when he realized Nick paid him
no attention. Following the foreman’s line of sight, Travis saw that new girl on the office trailer steps.
“What do ya make a her?” Nick asked, his expression one of awe.
The worker to Travis’ left sneered and spit a wad of chew into the mud at his feet. “All women on a pipeline are whor—”
“She’s dangerous,” Travis interrupted. “She’s too small.” Casting a glance in Andy’s direction, he scowled. “She’ll likely get someone distracted and killed.”
“Come on, Rooster,” Nick scoffed, shoving Travis with his elbow. “You’re just smitten, that’s all.”
“Hardly,” Travis assured his friend. “I’ve got work to do…” With a frown he turned and headed back into the warehouse trailer. He had no idea why the girl was here and he didn’t really care, other than to be wary about the problems she’d cause. He had too much riding on this job to waste time over a silly woman. The work wasn’t going to do it’s self while the men stood staring.
Nick, however, took all the time he wanted.


Giveaway

$25 Amazon

Follow the tour HERE for exclusive content and a giveaway!


www.silverdaggertours.com

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